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EMODnet Human Activities » Entries tagged with "Shipping"

Achieving zero-waste from marine traffic

Achieving zero-waste from marine traffic

Marine litter is widely recognised as a significant threat to the marine environment and ports have a vital role in reducing it. The discharges of ship-generated waste and cargo residues into the sea that contributed to the estimated 20% and 40%, respectively, of the total amount of the marine debris originated from sea-based sources. Wastes generated on ships include sewage, domestic and operational wastes (garbage) and cargo residues generated during the service of a ship. When … Read entire article »

Filed under: News, Uncategorized

Liquid vs. dry bulk goods – which one prevails?

Liquid vs. dry bulk goods – which one prevails?

Dear reader, as of July 2018 on the EMODnet Human Activities portal you can see the most recent datasets for maritime traffic of vessels, goods, and passengers! These data are available from 2001 onwards for most of the EU maritime Member States. Obviously, maritime transport statistics are not transmitted by the landlocked countries with no maritime traffic such as Czech Republic, Luxembourg, Hungary, Austria or Slovakia. A newly updated dataset on traffic of goods reveals that, annually … Read entire article »

Filed under: News

EMODnet Human Activities behind the scenes: find out what’s next!

EMODnet Human Activities behind the scenes: find out what’s next!

With the beginning of the second year of the new phase, the EMODnet Human Activities team took the opportunity to organise a partner meeting, so as to take stock of the progress made so far and plan the work ahead. When a project is called “The European Marine Observation and Data Network”, you don’t have many options, the meeting’s got to take place in a sea city; and sea city it was. Our friends and colleagues … Read entire article »

Filed under: News

Fishing for data – EMODnet and the oldest maritime activity

Fishing for data – EMODnet and the oldest maritime activity

Together with shipping, fishing is probably the maritime activity par excellence. There is evidence that humans have been harvesting food from the sea since the times of hunters-gatherers, who soon learned to also produce pots for cooking the fish they caught. Things have evolved since then, and whether carried out by large trawlers or small vessels, fishing is now a professional activity that makes a significant contribution to nutrition, as well as to economic growth, especially … Read entire article »

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Vessel density map: and so it begins!

Vessel density map: and so it begins!

In June we left you with a promise: we’d make a vessel density map of EU waters and we’d share it on our portal for you to view and download. In the meantime, several things have happened. A meeting took place in Brussels in September and the discussion ensued enabled us to better define the requirements that the maps should have to be as useful as possible to the maritime community. Getting Started Now, we’ve just purchased … Read entire article »

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Looking at EU maritime freight transport countries and ports

Looking at EU maritime freight transport countries and ports

Here at EMODnet Human Activities, we have just updated our ports traffic data. We thought it was a good time to take a look at recent statistics concerning EU maritime freight transport. The Netherlands, which overtook the United Kingdom in 2010 as the largest EU maritime freight transport country, has reported the largest volumes of seaborne freight handling in Europe every year since then. According to Eurostat, the volume of seaborne goods handled in Dutch ports (594 million … Read entire article »

Filed under: News

Vessel density maps: help us make a difference

Vessel density maps: help us make a difference

If we asked people what is the first human activity that comes to mind when thinking about the ocean, most would probably say shipping. We’ve used ships to move people and goods across waterways for millennia. We’ve developed trade and settled in remote areas of our planet; we’ve fought brutal wars, but also inspired generations of poets enthralled by the irresistible charm of the ocean. Today maritime transport remains the backbone of the global economy and … Read entire article »

Filed under: News